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Journal Article

Citation

Lion A, van der Zwaard BC, Remillieux S, Perrin PP, Buatois S. Scand. J. Med. Sci. Sports 2015; 26(7): 739-744.

Affiliation

Institut Lorrain de Formation en Masso-Kinésithérapie (ILFMK) de Nancy, Nancy, France.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2015, John Wiley and Sons)

DOI

10.1111/sms.12505

PMID

26105683

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the protective mechanisms or risk factors that can be related to the occurrence of hand climbing-related injuries (CRIH ). CRIH (tendon, pulley, muscle, and joint injuries) were retrospectively screened in 528 adult climbers. The questionnaire contained anthropometric items (e.g., body mass index - BMI), as well as items regarding climbing and basic training activities (warm-up, cool-down and session durations, number of session per week, hydration, practice level, climbing surface, and duration of the cardiovascular training). Higher skilled climbers and climbers with BMI above 21 kg/m(2) were more likely to have experienced CRIH (P < 0.01). Climbers with BMI above 20 kg/m(2) were more likely to have tendon injuries while those with a BMI above 21 kg/m(2) were more likely to have pulley injuries (P < 0.01). Skilled climbers, who climb more difficult routes, may use smaller grip size and a reduced number of fingers. Higher BMI will require a higher force to climb. Both high level and elevated BMI may increase the demands to the hands and fingers leading to CRIH. These risk factors are difficult to address as we cannot recommend the climbers to climb easier routes and decrease their BMI below 20 kg/m(2).


Language: en

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