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Journal Article

Citation

Culp K, Tonelli S. Workplace Health Saf. 2019; 67(4): 168-178.

Affiliation

University of Iowa.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Healio)

DOI

10.1177/2165079918813380

PMID

30724664

Abstract

Heat-related illness (HRI) is a largely undocumented phenomenon in Midwestern Hispanic migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the United States. Frequently, the physiological burden of crop production is overlooked while workers are in the fields. We completed a mixed-methods study using a cross-sectional survey among migrant and seasonal farmworkers about their experience with HRI symptoms ( N = 148) and conducted an intensive surveillance on a smaller group of workers ( N = 20) in field trials ( N = 57 trials) using a chest-strapped multi-parameter monitoring wearable sensor (MPMWS) that measured skin/body temperature, heart and breathing rate, kilocalories burned per hour, and provided a physiological intensity (PI) score. The field trials were conducted across three classes of climate conditions and three PI score categories. We found that those in the uncomfortable category (PI score > 4.0) had a statistically significant ( F ratio = 16.41, p <.001) higher body temperatures ( M = 100.05°F) than those with a mild PI (range = 0-5) score ⩽ 2.5 ( M = 99.56°F) or moderate PI score > 2.5-4 (99.84°F). We also found that those in the uncomfortable climate condition category had a higher mean heart rate and breathing rate than those working under mild and moderate field trials.


Language: en

Keywords

agricultural work; contingent workers; diversity; health surveillance; immigrant; occupational health and safety programs; research; safety; workforce

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