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Journal Article

Citation

Bicalho LEA, Albuquerque MR, Ugrinowitsch H, Da Costa VT, Parma JO, Dos Santos Ribeiro T, Lage GM. Hum. Mov. Sci. 2019; 64: 142-152.

Affiliation

Department of Physical Education, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 6627 Av. Presidente Carlos Luz - Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901, Brazil. Electronic address: menezeslage@gmail.com.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.humov.2019.02.001

PMID

30735818

Abstract

The benefits of less repetitive practice in motor learning have been explained by the increased demand for memory processes during the execution of motor skills. Recently, a new perspective associating increased demand for perception with less repetitive practice has also been proposed. Augmented information gathering and visual scanning characterize this higher perceptual demand. To extend our knowledge about mental effort and perceptual differences in practice organization, the association between oculomotor behavior and type of practice was investigated. We required participants to press four keys with different absolute and relative timing goals during the acquisition phase. An eye-tracker captured visual scanning of the skill's absolute and relative information displayed on the screen. Participants were tested 24 h after acquisition by a retention and transfer test. A higher level of both pupil dilation and amount of eyeblinks indicated an increased mental effort in less repetitive practice compared to more repetitive practice. Visual scanning of the skill's relative and absolute information was specific to the type of practice. The findings indicate many differences in oculomotor behavior associated with the practice schedule.

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Language: en

Keywords

Mental workload; Motor learning; Perception; Practice schedule; Sensory processing; Working memory

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