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Journal Article

Citation

Cervero R, Denman S, Jin Y. Transp. Policy 2019; 74: 153-164.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.tranpol.2018.09.007

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

Rates of cycling to work vary significantly from one urban area to another but the reasons for these variations are not well understood. Existing literature highlights the importance of built environments, urban amenities, and high-quality bicycle networks in promoting cycling. However, few studies measure the respective contributions and weigh the collective magnitude of effects of these influences together. We present a multivariate model that reflects the influences of such factors for 36 cities and towns in Britain. The models reveal a complex web of forces shaping cycling to work, confirming that there is no single, silver-bullet factor even in cities with remarkably high commuter cycling. The model results highlight the importance in joining up network level interventions, for instance to reduce both route circuity and on-road stress, which are objectives often being pursued separately. The results also highlight the importance of non-transport aspects such as land use mix and landscape amenities along commuter routes, and the role of city-specific cycling culture. They also underscore the need for closer collaboration between promoters of commuter cycling and wider urban disciplines to create low-stress routes and supportive built environments in cities and their outskirts.


Language: en

Keywords

Built environment; Cycling; Journeys to work; Land-use planning; Travel demand modelling; Zero inflated beta regression

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