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Journal Article

Citation

Tsong Y, Ullman SE. Women Ther. 2018; 41(3-4): 298-315.

Affiliation

Department of Criminology, Law & Justice, University of Illinois, Chicago.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2018, Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)

DOI

10.1080/02703149.2018.1430340

PMID

30739975

PMCID

PMC6366838

Abstract

Even though approximately one in three Asian American (AA) and Pacific Islander women experience sexual assault victimization, there is a dearth of literature examining how AA women sexual assault survivors cope with this traumatic experience. This study examined AA female sexual assault survivors' choice of coping strategies post-assault and how their cognitive responses toward sexual assault victimization (e.g., attributions of self-blame, perceived control over the recovery process) relate to their use of coping strategies. Using the AA subsets of two large community studies, a total of 64 AA women ages 18 to 58 with unwanted sexual experiences after the age of 14 years were included in the analyses.

RESULTS indicated that AA survivors used Acceptance and Self-Distraction the most to cope with sexual assault. In addition, those who perceived they had less control over their recovery process tended to use more maladaptive coping strategies, such as substance abuse and behavioral disengagement (e.g., giving up).

DISCUSSIONs include clinical implications and recommendations for using language, modalities, and foci of interventions that are consistent with clients' and their families' worldviews (e.g., indirect inquiries, solution-focused).


Language: en

Keywords

Asian American women; coping; help-seeking; sexual assault; trauma

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