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Journal Article

Citation

Ascencio-Lane JC, Smart D, Lippmann J. Diving Hyperb. Med. 2019; 49(1): 21-29.

Affiliation

Department of Public Health and Preventative Medicine at Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society and European Underwater and Baromedical Society)

DOI

10.28920/dhm49.1.21-29

PMID

30856664

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: This study reviews diving deaths that occurred in Tasmanian waters over a 20-year period.

METHODS: Detailed analysis was undertaken of deaths that occurred from 01 January 1995 to 31 December 2014. The cases were collated from numerous sources. Utilising a chain of events analysis, factors were identified and assigned to predisposing factors, triggers, disabling agents, disabling injuries and cause of death. These were then scrutinised to ascertain regional variables, remediable factors and linkages which may benefit from targeted risk mitigation strategies.

RESULTS: Seventeen deaths were identified across this 20-year period, which included one additional case not previously recorded. All were recreational divers and 15 were male. Five were hookah divers, 12 were scuba divers. Important predisposing factors identified included equipment (condition and maintenance), pre-existing health conditions, diver experience and training. These factors can now be used to promote public health messages for divers.

CONCLUSIONS: This 20-year study highlighted regional variations for Tasmanian deaths and presents opportunities for strategies to prevent diving deaths in the future. Of particular concern was the diving practice of 'hookah' diving, which has no governing regulations. The study highlighted the importance of applying a structured methodology such as chain of events analysis to scrutinise diving deaths.

Copyright: This article is the copyright of the authors who grant Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine a non-exclusive licence to publish the article in electronic and other forms.


Language: en

Keywords

Case reports; Diving deaths; Diving incidents; Incidents; Risk management; Root-cause analysis; Safety

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