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Journal Article

Citation

McCart M, Glang AE, Slocumb J, Gau J, Beck L, Gomez D. Disabil. Rehabil. 2019; ePub(ePub): ePub.

Affiliation

Center on Brain Injury Research and Training, University of Oregon , Eugene , OR , USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)

DOI

10.1080/09638288.2019.1578423

PMID

30978108

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Each year ∼700 000 U.S. children ages 0-19 years sustain a traumatic brain injury. Children who experience brain injury are at risk for impairments in executive function, processing speed, cognition, memory, attention, and behavior which can lead to school failure. However, few teachers or other educational professionals receive training on effectively working with students who have traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of an online traumatic brain injury professional development intervention, In the Classroom after Concussion: Best Practices for Student Success.

METHODS: This quasi-experimental study examined the effects of online traumatic brain injury professional development (In the Classroom after Concussion: Best Practices for Student Success) on educator knowledge, knowledge application, and self-efficacy in a practitioner setting with a sample of 81 educators from all professional backgrounds. Participants completed the pretest, accessed the In the Classroom training and posttest, and completed follow-up assessments 30 days after the posttest. MEASURES: (1) knowledge of effective strategies for working with students with TBI; (2) knowledge application; (3) self-efficacy in handling situations presented in text and video scenarios, and (4) a standardized measure of educator self-efficacy.

RESULTS: On the posttest assessment, educators showed significant gains in knowledge (p = 0.001, r = 0.62), knowledge application (p = 0.001, r = 0.63), and self-efficacy (p = 0.008, r = 0.29). At 30-day follow up, educators maintained significant gains in knowledge (p = 0.001, r = 0.62) and self-efficacy (p value = 0.008, r = 0.28), but not in knowledge application.

CONCLUSION: Given the prevalence of traumatic brain injury, it is important to develop evidence-based, cost-effective approaches to knowledge transfer and exchange in traumatic brain injury professional development. In the Classroom is one such approach. Implications for rehabilitation Without training in TBI, educators will be poorly prepared to monitor students' post-injury challenges and to address learning and behavioral challenges as they occur. Given the prevalence of TBI, it is important to develop evidence-based, cost-effective approaches to knowledge transfer and exchange in TBI professional development. In the Classroom is one such approach.


Language: en

Keywords

Education; brain injury; schools; staff development; training program; web-based

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