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Journal Article

Citation

Raman S, Engelhard M, Kollins SH. Pediatrics 2019; ePub(ePub): ePub.

Affiliation

Psychology and Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, American Academy of Pediatrics)

DOI

10.1542/peds.2019-0820

PMID

31110160

Abstract

Individuals diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) across the life span are at significantly increased risk for a wide range of adverse outcomes, including substance use, obesity, and suicidal behavior. Risky driving, measured in a variety of ways, has also been shown to be consistently elevated in those with ADHD and likely contributes to the substantial risk for morbidity and premature mortality associated with this clinical diagnosis. Curry et al extend these important findings with their report “Traffic Crashes, Violations, and Suspensions Among Young Drivers With ADHD” in this issue of Pediatrics. Using robust linkage data between electronic health record (EHR) (to capture ADHD diagnosis) and state driving databases (to capture licensure and violation and/or crash data), they report that the initial period after driving licensure is a particularly vulnerable time for those with ADHD, and that this risk extends to most categories of violations and crashes. Especially noteworthy is that teenagers with ADHD who delay licensure do not achieve better outcomes than those who are licensed closer to the legal age, and their results underscore the role …


Language: en

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