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Journal Article

Citation

Azevedo AB, Trent RB, Ellis A. J. Trauma 1998; 45(6): 1084-1087.

Affiliation

Office of Dental Health Services and the Injury Surveillance and Epidemiology Section, California Department of Health Services, Sacramento, USA. rsun@ns.net

Copyright

(Copyright © 1998, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

9867053

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study describes mandibular fracture incidence, causes, and consequences in a large population. METHODS: California hospital discharge data from 1991 to 1993 were examined to describe causes, lengths of stay, and hospital charges for patients hospitalized for mandibular fractures. Rates were calculated per 100,000 population. RESULTS: There were 10,766 discharges with mandibular fracture as principal diagnosis or as diagnoses two through five on the discharge record (rate=11.5). Of these, 2,694 had mandibular fracture as the only diagnosis (principal diagnosis). For all 10,766 cases, assaults were responsible for more than half (54.0%) of all admissions for mandibular fracture. The highest rates were found among males (18.7), blacks (43.0), and adults aged 16 to 20 (26.5). Charges for the initial hospitalization (excluding physician's fees) for the 2,694 cases with only a diagnosis of mandibular fracture were used to estimate mean charges ($8,740). The total extrapolated 1993 inflation-adjusted hospital charges for mandibular fractures were $34 million per year. Most patients' bills were submitted to government payers, such as Medicaid. CONCLUSION: Treatment of mandibular fractures represents a considerable cost to public-supported programs as well as to patients.

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