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Journal Article

Citation

Marger E, Barr RL. J. Forensic Sci. 1980; 25(4): 893-901.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1980, American Society for Testing and Materials, Publisher John Wiley and Sons)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

7430999

Abstract

The use of sophisticated methods of criminological investigation and fact determinations, coupled with advances in forensic sciences and in criminal law and with the extensive procedural safeguards and mechanisms available to prosecutors and defense attorneys alike are, more often than not, taken for granted. Yet, it was not long ago that our legal system functioned on relatively rudimentary procedures, and the tools available to investigate crime and to determine factual matters were little more than very basic scientific principles crudely adapted to the needs of the criminologist. Criminology itself is both a relatively new concept and a distinct branch of forensic sciences. This paper will examine some of the more interesting historical developments in the fields of jurisprudence, criminology, and forensic sciences in order to gain an insight into the contemporary quality of our legal system.


Language: en

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