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Journal Article

Citation

Testa M, Livingston JA. Subst. Use Misuse 2009; 44(9-10): 1349-1376.

Affiliation

Research Institute on Addictions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA. testa@ria.buffalo.edu

Copyright

(Copyright © 2009, Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)

DOI

10.1080/10826080902961468

PMID

19938922

PMCID

PMC2784921

Abstract

Before effective prevention interventions can be developed, it is necessary to identify the mechanisms that contribute to the targeted negative outcomes. A review of the literature on women's substance use and sexual victimization points to women's heavy episodic drinking as a proximal risk factor, particularly among college samples. At least half of sexual victimization incidents involve alcohol use and the majority of rapes of college women occur when the victim is too intoxicated to resist ("incapacitated rape"). Despite the importance of women's heavy episodic drinking as being a risk factor, existing rape prevention programs have rarely addressed women's alcohol use and have shown little success in reducing rates of sexual victimization. We argue that given the strength of the association between heavy episodic drinking and sexual victimization among young women, prevention programs targeting drinking may prove more efficacious than programs targeting sexual vulnerability. Applications of existing drinking prevention strategies to reducing women's sexual victimization are discussed.


Language: en

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