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Journal Article

Citation

Delgado JH, Ramirez-Cardich ME, Gilman RH, Lavarello R, Dahodwala N, Bazan A, Rodriguez V, Cama RI, Tovar M, Lescano A. Inj. Prev. 2002; 8(1): 38-41.

Affiliation

Benefit Association PRISMA (Projects in Informatics, Medicine, Health and Agriculture), Lima, Peru.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2002, BMJ Publishing Group)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

11928972

PMCID

PMC1730827

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the presentation of burns in children and risk factors associated with their occurrence in a developing country as a basis for future prevention programs. DESIGN: Case-control study. Setting: Burn unit of the National Institute of Child Health (Instituto Nacional de Salud del Nino) in Lima, Peru. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered to all consenting guardians of children admitted to the burns (cases) and general medicine (controls) units during a period of 14 months. Guardians of patients were questioned regarding etiology of the injury, demographic and socioeconomic data. RESULTS: 740 cases and controls were enrolled. Altogether 77.5% of the cases burns occurred in the patient's home, with 67.8% in the kitchen; 74% were due to scalding. Most involved children younger than 5 years. Lack of water supply (odds ratio (OR) 5.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1 to 1 2.3), low income (OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.0 to 3.9), and crowding (OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.7 to 3.6) were associated with an increased risk. The presence of a living room (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4 to 0.8) and better maternal education (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.9) were protective factors. CONCLUSIONS: To prevent burns interventions should be directed to low socioeconomic status groups; these interventions should be designed accordingly to local risk factors.

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