SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Kypri K, Chalmers DJ, Langley JD, Wright CS. Inj. Prev. 2002; 8(1): 32-37.

Affiliation

Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2002, BMJ Publishing Group)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

11928971

PMCID

PMC1730831

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Adolescents are over-represented in injury statistics. New Zealand is privileged in having a hospital discharge database allowing for analysis of non-fatal injury data at a national level. An epidemiological description of adolescent injury morbidity is provided and options for prevention are discussed. METHOD: People aged 15-19 years admitted to hospital for their injuries in the period 1 987-96 were identified from the New Zealand Health Information Service morbidity data files. The manner, causes, and nature of injury were examined. Injury prevention strategies were reviewed. Results: The incidence of hospitalised injury was 1,886 per 100,000 person years. The victims were male (70%). The leading causes of injury were road traffic crashes, sports injuries, and self poisoning. The most common injury diagnoses were head injuries (29%) and limb fractures (21%). Road traffic crashes produced the highest proportion of serious injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Road traffic crashes, sports injuries, and self inflicted poisoning, stood out as areas with the greatest potential for reducing the burden of injury in late adolescence. Graduated driver licensing shows promise as an injury prevention measure but remains inadequately implemented. Policies to reduce self inflicted poisoning are of unknown efficacy, and evidence is awaited on the effectiveness of measures to reduce injury in sport.

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print