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Journal Article

Citation

MacAfee KA. Penn. Dent. J. (Phila) 1994; 93(1-2): 16-7, 25.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1994, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

15503562

Abstract

Injuries to the maxillofacial region sustained in sports related trauma are increasing in the United States. The pediatric (age 12 and younger) and teenage populations account for the greatest number of these injuries primarily due to increased team sports participation in these younger age groups. A severe injury to the maxillofacial region can have devastating psychological effects as well as being physically debilitating. Therefore, early treatment of soft tissue and bony injuries will minimize scarring and decrease potentially adverse psychological implications. Sports trauma is a frequent source of maxillofacial injuries especially in the younger population. Basic protective equipment, such as proper fitting helmets, mouth guards and face masks, are still not mandatory, or rules not enforced, in many youth hockey and American football leagues. In addition, the increased popularity of multispeed bicycles, dirt bikes, and off-road vehicles (e.g. snowmobiles, go-carts) in the hands of unrestrained and unprotected children and adolescents has contributed to an increasing number of maxillofacial injuries in these groups.


Language: en

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