SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Alfaro DV, Chaudhry NA, Walonker AF, Runyan T, Saito Y, Liggett PE. Retina 1994; 14(3): 201-205.

Affiliation

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland 120814-4799.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1994, Ophthalmic Communications Society, Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

7973113

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Penetrating eye injuries remain an important cause of blindness among children. METHODS: Thirty consecutive children, nine years of age or younger, were treated for penetrating eye injuries. Twenty-two (73%) of those patients studied were male and 8 (17%) were female. The average age of the patients was 4.6 years. Sharp objects accounted for the majority of injuries (83%). Twenty (66%) eyes required only primary repair and 10 (33%) eyes required secondary lensectomy and vitreous surgery, which was done within 10 days of the primary repair. Length of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 48 months, and 5 patients were lost to follow-up. RESULTS: Visual acuity of 20/40 or better was achieved in 13 (72%) of the 18 patients requiring only primary repair. Stereopsis was present in 13 (87%) of these patients. Of those patients that underwent secondary lensectomy with anterior or pars plana vitrectomy, 42% had visual acuity of 20/100 or better. None had stereopsis. CONCLUSION: Young children with penetrating eye injuries requiring only primary repair may achieve excellent visual recovery, whereas those with traumatic cataract necessitating lensectomy and vitreous surgery have a less favorable outcome because of more severe injury and subsequent amblyopia.


Language: en

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print