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Journal Article

Citation

Chae JH, Piedmont RL, Estadt BK, Wicks RJ. J. Pers. Assess. 1995; 65(3): 468-485.

Affiliation

Loyola College, Columbia, MD 21045, USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1995, Society for Personality Assessment, Publisher Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)

DOI

10.1207/s15327752jpa6503_7

PMID

16367710

Abstract

The purpose of this study was both to determine if the Impostor Phenomenon (IP) can be reliably and validly assessed in a Korean context and if so, evaluate the construct within the context of Jungian typology and the 5-factor model of personality. A sample of 654 Korean men and women were selected from 4 major Korean cities and administered the Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale (CIPS; Clance & Imes, 1978) along with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI, Form G; Myers & McCaulley, 1985) and NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992). Results indicated that the CIPS was very reliable, and the pattern of correlates suggested impostors to be introverted types on the MBTI. Results with the NEO-PI-R showed impostors to be very high on neuroticism and low on conscientiousness. This pattern of correlates is similar to other performance-inhibiting constructs such as fear of success and fear of failure. It was argued that IP be construed more as a motivational style than as a distinct clinical syndrome. The IP seems to be less pervasive in Korea than America and these cross-cultural implications were discussed.


Language: en

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