SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Strugar J, Sass KJ, Buchanan CP, Spencer DD, Lowe DK. J. Trauma 1993; 34(4): 555-8; discussion 558-9.

Affiliation

Section of Neurological Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1993, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

8487341

Abstract

This study evaluated the memory and intellectual function of 32 adults following minimal brain injury. All patients had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 upon evaluation in the Emergency Room, negative findings on radiographic examination, and negative history of prior neurologic disease or injury. Seventeen of these had experienced a loss of consciousness. Patients suffering a loss of consciousness postinjury obtained significantly lower mean verbal intelligence quotients than those obtained by patients who remained conscious following their accidents. Both groups exhibited memory impairments. This could indicate that loss of consciousness predicts intellectual impairment, but not degree of memory dysfunction. An alternative interpretation of these data is that patients referred for examination after a head injury that did not involve a loss of consciousness included a disproportionate number of patients from upper socioeconomic levels who have greater access to medical delivery systems or greater sophistication regarding cognitive function.


Language: en

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print