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Journal Article

Citation

Tan LR, Waxman K, Scannell G, Ioli G, Granger GA. J. Trauma 1993; 34(5): 634-638.

Affiliation

Department of Surgery, University of California, Irvine.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1993, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

8388481

Abstract

The importance of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the pathophysiology of trauma and hemorrhagic shock is not known. In addition, TNF bioactivity may be modulated by soluble forms of the 55-kd and 75-kd membrane receptors (TNFR). This study was undertaken to determine circulating levels of TNF and TNFR after trauma. Nine severely injured male patients were studied. The mean age was 30 +/- 10 years (range, 15-45). The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 31.3 +/- 17.6 (range, 10-59), and the mean Revised Trauma Score (RTS), 5.7 +/- 2.2 (range, 0.7-7.8). Serum was obtained immediately upon arrival at our trauma center, within 1 hour of injury. The TNF and TNFR levels in the serum were measured using ELISA techniques. After trauma, 55-kd and 75-kd TNFR levels were significantly elevated above those of controls (6.99 +/- 4.57 ng/mL and 5.42 +/- 1.88 ng/mL, respectively, p < 0.01); TNF levels were not increased. Patient serum containing TNFR inhibited in vitro TNF cytotoxicity and correlated with 55-kd TNFR levels (p < 0.05). We conclude that TNF is a strong releasing factor for TNFR; the presence of TNFR may be indirect evidence that TNF is present after trauma, despite low measured levels. Both TNF and TNFR may be more important in trauma and hemorrhagic shock than previously thought.


Language: en

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