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Journal Article

Citation

Frick EJ, Cipolle MD, Pasquale MD, Wasser TE, Rhodes M, Singer RL, Nastasee SA. J. Trauma 1997; 43(5): 844-851.

Affiliation

Department of Surgery, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18105-1556, USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1997, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

9390499

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with blunt thoracic aortic injury and identify factors predictive of outcome. METHODS: Hospital charts, trauma registry data, and autopsies of 64 patients with blunt thoracic aortic injury from 1988 to 1995 were reviewed. RESULTS: Patients were identified and segregated based on admission physiology. Group 1 patients (n = 19) arrived in arrest. Group 2 patients (n = 10) arrived in shock with systolic BP 90. Group 3 patients (n = 35) arrived with systolic BP>90. All patients in groups 1 and 2 expired. Injury Severity Scores for nonsurvivors in group 3 (n = 12) were significantly higher than survivors. There were no significant differences when comparing time of injury to repair or arrival between groups, or in mortality or paralysis comparing repair techniques or clamp/bypass times. Double lumen endotracheal tubes caused significant operative delays compared to single lumen tubes. CONCLUSIONS: Predictors of survivability were hemodynamic stability on arrival and lower Injury Severity Scores. In thoracic aortic injury patients arriving hemodynamically stable, Injury Severity Score correlated with mortality but not paralysis.


Language: en

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