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Journal Article

Citation

Smith DN. Am. Psychol. 1998; 53(7): 743-753.

Affiliation

Department of Sociology, University of Kansas, Lawrence 66045-2969, USA. emerald@lark.cc.ukans.edu

Copyright

(Copyright © 1998, American Psychological Association)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

9699457

Abstract

In April 1994, the small east African nation of Rwanda became the site of one of the most violent episodes of the 20th century. Over the course of just 100 days, an embattled authoritarian state organized the slaughter of at least 850,000 Rwandans. Briefly, worldwide attention was riveted. But clich├ęs about "age-old tribal hatreds" soon dominated discussion, conveying the impression that this was simply the latest episode in an unending cycle of violence. The truth, however, is quite different. The April genocide was in many ways unique. It was neither tribal nor age-old, and it is hardly fated to recur. Indeed, the author's premise is that if this genocide is grasped in all its psychocultural novelty and complexity, a point of Archimedean leverage can be found for interventions to avert tragedies in the future.


Language: en

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