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Journal Article

Citation

Mastroianni GR, Zupan MF, Chuba DM, Berger RC, Wile AL. Appl. Ergon. 2000; 31(5): 479-485.

Affiliation

Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership, United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO 80840, USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2000, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

11059461

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purposes of this study were (1) to compare self-chosen speed of off-road cyclists and runners on a hilly course, (2) to compare the energy expenditure of off-road cyclists and runners on the same terrain, and (3) to describe changes in energy expenditure over the course of the exercise period. METHODS: Runners and cyclists performed three laps on a 2.75 km gravel course in a single exercise bout. The course was divided into 13 segments differing in grade and length. Position on the course and heart rate were recorded every few seconds. Speed was computed for each course segment on each lap; energy expenditure was estimated using recorded heart rates and exercise-specific maximal oxygen uptake measurements made prior to participation in the study. RESULTS: There were significant relationships between grade and speed for both runners (r = 0.64) and cyclists (r = 0.44). The differences between cyclists and runners were greatest on downhill segments. Energy expenditure rates were not significantly different for runners (71.6% VO2 peak) and cyclists (68.5% VO2 peak). CONCLUSIONS: Off-road cycling and running are comparable in energy demands. Variation in skill levels may account for the increased variability in speed among cyclists on downhill terrain.


Language: en

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