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Journal Article

Citation

Brendgen M, Vitaro F, Boivin M, Dionne G, Perusse D. Dev. Psychol. 2006; 42(6): 1299-1312.

Affiliation

Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Québec, Canada. brendgen.mara@uqam.ca

Copyright

(Copyright © 2006, American Psychological Association)

DOI

10.1037/0012-1649.42.6.1299

PMID

17087562

Abstract

This study compared the contribution of genes and environment to teacher-rated reactive and proactive aggression in 6-year-old twin pairs (172 pairs: 55 monozygotic girls, 48 monozygotic boys, 33 dizygotic girls, 36 dizygotic boys). Genetic effects accounted for 39% of the variance of reactive aggression and for 41% of the variance of proactive aggression. The remainder of the variance was explained by unique environmental effects. Genetic as well as unique environmental effects were significantly correlated across reactive and proactive aggression (genetic correlation = .87, environmental correlation = .34), but this overlap was largely due to a common underlying form of aggression (i.e., teacher-rated physical aggression). Once common etiological factors due to physical aggression were accounted for, reactive and proactive aggression shared no other genes and only a few environmental influences, although additional specific genetic and environmental effects were observed for both reactive and proactive aggression. These specific effects indicate that both reactive and proactive aggression may be influenced mostly by socialization experiences that are specific to each type of aggression and only to a very small degree by specific genes.


Language: en

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