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Journal Article

Citation

Rodkin PC, Farmer TW, Pearl R, Van Acker R. Dev. Psychol. 2000; 36(1): 14-24.

Affiliation

Department of Psychology: Social & Health Sciences, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0085, USA. rodkin@duke.edu

Copyright

(Copyright © 2000, American Psychological Association)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

10645741

Abstract

This study examined subtypes of popular 4th-6th grade boys (N = 452). Popular-prosocial (model) and popular-antisocial (tough) configurations were identified by means of teacher ratings and compared with peer and self-assessments and social centrality measures. Peers perceived model boys as cool, athletic, leaders, cooperative, studious, not shy, and nonaggressive. Peers perceived tough boys as cool, athletic, and antisocial. Model boys saw themselves as nonaggressive and academically competent. Tough boys saw themselves as popular, aggressive, and physically competent. Tough boys were disproportionately African American, particularly when African Americans were a minority in their classrooms. Model and tough boys were overrepresented at nuclear social centrality levels. These findings suggest that highly aggressive boys can be among the most popular and socially connected children in elementary classrooms.


Language: en

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