SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Crebolder JM, Sloan RB. Appl. Ergon. 2004; 35(4): 371-381.

Affiliation

Human Factors Research and Engineering, Defence Research and Development Canada, 1133 Sheppard Avenue West, Toronto, Ont., Canada M3M 3B9. jacqui.crebolder@drdc-rddc.gc.ca

Copyright

(Copyright © 2004, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.apergo.2004.02.005

PMID

15159202

Abstract

The effect of fog on eyewear was evaluated by having individuals perform a target detection task in environments that typically cause eyewear to fog while wearing either eyewear that had been treated with anti-fog coating, eyewear not treated, or no eyewear. Detection was higher with eyewear that had been treated with anti-fog coating compared to uncoated lenses and no difference was observed between wearing coated eyewear and wearing no eyewear. The study concluded that fogging of lenses has a significant effect on visual detection and the use of anti-fog coating is relatively effective. However, in environments where prolonged fogging occurs water droplets form on anti-fog coated lenses which disrupts visual performance in a manner similar to the fog it is trying to prevent. It is recommended that anti-fog coating be considered when purchasing protective eyewear, and a bench test be developed to assess the coatings applied to eyewear.


Language: en

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print