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Journal Article

Citation

Hon KL, Kwok LW, Leung TF. Acta Paediatr. 2004; 93(2): 270-272.

Affiliation

Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 6/F, Clinical Sciences Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong. b103892@cuhk.edu.hk

Copyright

(Copyright © 2004, John Wiley and Sons)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

15046287

Abstract

AIM: To review the pattern and characteristics of snakebites in children in rural Hong Kong. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted. RESULTS: Seven cases of snakebite in children were reported. Eighty-six percent of the victims were male, and the majority of bites (86%) occurred on the left extremities. Green pit vipers (Trimeresurus albolabris) accounted for most of the snakebites. Local symptomatology was common. Swelling, pain and fang marks were documented in all cases. A mildly deranged clotting profile was found in 70% of patients. There was no incidence of systemic symptoms, cardiopulmonary complications or compartment syndrome. Victims arrived at the hospital at a median (range) time of 40 (10-70) min since the snakebite. Only one child received antivenin owing to severe progressive local symptoms under intensive care monitoring. The median hospital stay of the patients was 4 d. The hands and feet of adolescent boys (n = 6) seem to be particularly prone to being bitten. CONCLUSION: Children should be discouraged to play in areas where snakes may hide, especially in the evening in summer to autumn. They should wear protective footwear.


Language: en

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