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Journal Article

Citation

Lesens O, Schmidt A, De Rancourt F, Poirier V, Labbe A, Laurichesse H, Marty L, Beytout J, Vorilhon P. PLoS One 2012; 7(2): e31313.

Affiliation

Clermont Université Laboratoire Microorganismes: Génome Environnement (LMGE), Université d'Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2012, Public Library of Science)

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0031313

PMID

22363614

PMCID

PMC3282684

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Families of internationally adopted children may face specific problems with which general practitioners (GPs) may not be familiar. The aim of the study was to explore problems faced by families before, during and after the arrival of their internationally adopted child and to assess the usefulness of a specific medical structure for internationally adopted children, which could be a resource for the GP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a qualitative study using individual semistructured guided conversations and interviewed 21 families that had adopted a total of 26 children internationally in the Puy de Dome department, France, in 2003. Quantitative data were used to describe the pathologies diagnosed and the investigations performed.Our study showed that the history of these families, from the start of the adoption project to its achievement, is complex and warrants careful analysis. Health-care providers should not only consider the medical aspects of adoption, but should also be interested in the histories of these families, which may play a role in the forming of attachments between the adoptee and their adoptive parents and prevent further trouble during the development of the child. We also showed that adoptive parents have similar fears or transient difficulties that may be resolved quickly by listening and reassurance. Most such families would support the existence of a specific medical structure for internationally adopted children, which could be a resource for the general practitioner. However, the health-care providers interviewed were divided on the subject and expressed their fear that a special consultation could be stigmatizing to children and families. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A specific consultation with well-trained and experienced practitioners acting in close collaboration with GPs and paediatricians may be of help in better understanding and supporting adopted children and their families.


Language: en

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