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Journal Article

Citation

Widom CS, Czaja SJ, Bentley T, Johnson MS. Am. J. Public Health 2012; 102(6): 1135-1144.

Affiliation

Cathy Spatz Widom and Sally J. Czaja are with the Psychology Department, John Jay College, City University of New York, New York, NY. Tyrone Bentley is with the Department of Pediatrics, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark. Mark S. Johnson is with the Department of Family Medicine, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2012, American Public Health Association)

DOI

10.2105/AJPH.2011.300636

PMID

22515854

Abstract

Objectives. We investigated whether abused and neglected children are at risk for negative physical health outcomes in adulthood. Methods. Using a prospective cohort design, we matched children (aged 0-11 years) with documented cases of physical and sexual abuse and neglect from a US Midwestern county during 1967 through 1971 with nonmaltreated children. Both groups completed a medical status examination (measured health outcomes and blood tests) and interview during 2003 through 2005 (mean age = 41.2 years). Results. After adjusting for age, gender, and race, child maltreatment predicted above normal hemoglobin, lower albumin levels, poor peak airflow, and vision problems in adulthood. Physical abuse predicted malnutrition, albumin, blood urea nitrogen, and hemoglobin A1C. Neglect predicted hemoglobin A1C, albumin, poor peak airflow, and oral health and vision problems, Sexual abuse predicted hepatitis C and oral health problems. Additional controls for childhood socioeconomic status, adult socioeconomic status, unhealthy behaviors, smoking, and mental health problems play varying roles in attenuating or intensifying these relationships. Conclusions. Child abuse and neglect affect long-term health status-increasing risk for diabetes, lung disease, malnutrition, and vision problems-and support the need for early health care prevention. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print April 19, 2012: e1-e10. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2011.300636).


Language: en

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