SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Sackett PR, Hardison CM, Cullen MJ. Am. Psychol. 2004; 59(1): 7-13.

Affiliation

Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, Elliott Hall, 75 E. River Road, Mineapolis, MN 55455, USA. psackett@tc.umn.edu

Comment In:

Am Psychol. 2005 Apr;60(3):267-9; discussion 271-2

Copyright

(Copyright © 2004, American Psychological Association)

DOI

10.1037/0003-066X.59.1.7

PMID

14736315

Abstract

C. M. Steele and J. Aronson (1995) showed that making race salient when taking a difficult test affected the performance of high-ability African American students, a phenomenon they termed stereotype threat. The authors document that this research is widely misinterpreted in both popular and scholarly publications as showing that eliminating stereotype threat eliminates the African American-White difference in test performance. In fact, scores were statistically adjusted for differences in students' prior SAT performance, and thus, Steele and Aronson's findings actually showed that absent stereotype threat, the two groups differ to the degree that would be expected based on differences in prior SAT scores. The authors caution against interpreting the Steele and Aronson experiment as evidence that stereotype threat is the primary cause of African American-White differences in test performance.


Language: en

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print