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Journal Article

Citation

Pang TY, Subic A, Takla M. Appl. Ergon. 2014; 45(2): 300-307.

Affiliation

School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia. Electronic address: tohyen.pang@rmit.edu.au.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2014, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.apergo.2013.04.011

PMID

23664244

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to establish an approach for measuring the dry and evaporative heat dissipation cricket helmets. A range of cricket helmets has been tested using a sweating manikin within a controlled climatic chamber. The thermal manikin experiments were conducted in two stages, namely the (i) dry test and (ii) wet test. The ambient air temperature for the dry tests was controlled to ∼23 °C, and the mean skin temperatures averaged ∼35 °C. The thermal insulation value measured for the manikin with helmet ensemble ranged from 1.0 to 1.2 clo. The results showed that among the five cricket helmets, the Masuri helmet offered slightly more thermal insulation while the Elite helmet offered the least. However, under the dry laboratory conditions and with minimal air movement (air velocity = 0.08 ± 0.01 ms(-1)), small differences exist between the thermal resistance values for the tested helmets. The wet tests were conducted in an isothermal condition, with an ambient and skin mean temperatures averaged ∼35 °C, the evaporative resistance, Ret, varied between 36 and 60 m(2) Pa W(-1). These large variations in evaporative heat dissipation values are due to the presence of a thick layer of comfort lining in certain helmet designs. This finding suggests that the type and design of padding may influence the rate of evaporative heat dissipation from the head and face; hence the type of material and thickness of the padding is critical for the effectiveness of evaporative heat loss and comfort of the wearer. Issues for further investigations in field trials are discussed.


Language: en

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