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Journal Article

Citation

Woods A, Collier J, Kendrick D, Watts K, Dewey M, Illingworth R. Inj. Prev. 2004; 10(2): 83-87.

Affiliation

Division of Primary Care, University of Nottingham, UK. woods@nottingham.ac.uk

Copyright

(Copyright © 2004, BMJ Publishing Group)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

15066971

PMCID

PMC1730074

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of injury prevention training. DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Primary care facilities in the East Midlands area of the United Kingdom. SUBJECTS: Midwives and health visitors. INTERVENTION: Evidence based training session on the risks associated with baby walkers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measures were knowledge of baby walker use and walker related injury, attitudes towards walkers and towards walker education, and practices relating to walker health education. RESULTS: Trained midwives and health visitors had greater knowledge of the risks associated with baby walkers than untrained midwives and health visitors (difference between the means 0.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12 to 0.33). Trained health visitors had more negative attitudes to baby walkers (difference between the means 0.35; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.59) and more positive attitudes towards baby walker health education (difference between the means 0.31; 95% CI 0.00 to 0.62) than untrained health visitors. Midwives who had been trained were more likely to discuss baby walkers in the antenatal period than those who were not trained (odds ratio 9.92; 95% CI 2.02 to 48.83). CONCLUSIONS: Injury prevention training was associated with increased knowledge, more negative attitudes towards walkers, and more positive attitudes towards walker education. Trained midwives were more likely to give advice antenatally. Training did not impact on other practices. Larger trials are required to assess the impact of training on parental safety behaviours, the adoption of safety practices, and injury reduction.


Language: en

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