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Journal Article

Citation

MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 1996; 45(47): 1029-1032.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1996, (in public domain), Publisher U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

8965803

Abstract

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas that is a product of incomplete combustion. Motor vehicles, heaters, and appliances that use carbon-based fuels are the main sources of this poison. Most fatal unintentional CO poisonings associated with motor vehicles are preventable and can result from differing mechanisms of exposure; 1) operation of a motor vehicle with a damaged or malfunctioning exhaust system and an inadequately ventilated passenger compartment, 2) operation of a motor vehicle in an enclosed space (e.g., a garage) with inadequate ventilation, and 3) use of auxiliary fuel-burning heaters inside a passenger compartment or in a camper. This report describes the investigation of deaths associated with multiple motor-vehicle-related CO poisonings in Colorado on November 3, 1996, summarizes a review of such deaths in New Mexico during 1980-1995, and presents geographic and seasonal patterns in national death rates for 1979-1992. These findings indicate that deaths from motor-vehicle-related unintentional CO poisonings increase during winter months and that death rates from CO poisoning in stationary motor vehicles are highest in states with colder average winter temperatures.


Language: en

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