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Journal Article

Citation

Bauman JE, Dean BS, Krenzelok EP. Vet. Hum. Toxico. 1989; 31(6): 563-566.

Affiliation

Pittsburgh Poison Center, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA 15213.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1989, American College of Veterinary Toxicologists)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

2617839

Abstract

Although most poisonings occur within the home, the toxic agents involved are customarily transported there by motor vehicles. Over a 9-month period, all potentially toxic exposures reported to a poison information center that occurred in a motor vehicle were collected. Common toxins were identified and associated incidence and risk were assessed; 68% were pediatric exposures and the remainder were in adults. The adult exposures were dermal and via inhalation, whereas the pediatric exposures were predominantly inhalation (44%) and ingestion (36%). Inhalant toxins included carbon monoxide (CO) (13%), fire extinguishers (48%), and hydrocarbons (17%). Ingested toxins were comprised of medications (36%), automotive products (14%), and cosmetics (14%). 26% of the exposures were treated in Emergency Departments and the remainder at home. 79% of the patients were asymptomatic or had only a mild outcome; 21% suffered moderate toxicity. Toxic exposures in motor vehicles pose a significant threat to both driver and occupants. Children are at high risk from products improperly stored in the car (shopping bags, purses, glove compartment) and resulting from the care giver's inattention while driving. These results can be used to promote community awareness of this problem.


Language: en

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