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Journal Article

Citation

Filtness AJ, Mitsopoulos-Rubens E, Rudin-Brown CM. Appl. Ergon. 2014; 45(4): 1247-1256.

Affiliation

Human Factors Team, Monash University Accident Research Centre (MUARC), Monash Injury Research Institute (MIRI), Building 70, Wellington Road, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2014, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.apergo.2014.03.002

PMID

24681072

Abstract

Musculoskeletal pain is commonly reported by police officers. A potential cause of officer discomfort is a mismatch between vehicle seats and the method used for carrying appointments. Twenty-five police officers rated their discomfort while seated in: (1) a standard police vehicle seat, and (2) a vehicle seat custom-designed for police use. Discomfort was recorded in both seats while wearing police appointments on: (1) a traditional appointments belt, and (2) a load-bearing vest/belt combination (LBV). Sitting in the standard vehicle seat and carrying appointments on a traditional appointments belt were both associated with significantly elevated discomfort. Four vehicle seat features were most implicated as contributing to discomfort: back rest bolster prominence; lumbar region support; seat cushion width; and seat cushion bolster depth. Authorising the carriage of appointments using a LBV is a lower cost solution with potential to reduce officer discomfort. Furthermore, the introduction of custom-designed vehicle seats should be considered.


Language: en

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