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Journal Article

Citation

Blake C, O'Malley E, Gissane C, Murphy JC. BMJ Open 2014; 4(6): e005059.

Affiliation

Medfit Proactive Healthcare, Blackrock, Ireland.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2014, BMJ Publishing Group)

DOI

10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005059

PMID

24948748

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Hurling is a stick handling game which, although native to Ireland, has international reach and presence. The aim of this study was to report incidence and type of injuries incurred by elite male hurling players over five consecutive playing seasons.

DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Male intercounty elite sports teams participating in the National GAA Injury Database, 2007-2011. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 856 players in 25 county teams were enrolled. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Incidence, nature and mechanism of injury were recorded by team physicians or physiotherapists to a secure online data collection portal. Time-loss injury rates per 1000 training and match play hours were calculated and injury proportions were expressed.

RESULTS: In total 1030 injuries were registered, giving a rate of 1.2 injuries per player. These were sustained by 71% (n=608) of players. Injury incidence rate was 2.99 (95% CI 2.68 to 3.30) per 1000 training hours and 61.75 (56.75 to 66.75) per 1000 match hours. Direct player-to-player contact was recorded in 38.6% injuries, with sprinting (24.5%) and landing (13.7%) the next most commonly reported injury mechanisms. Median duration of time absent from training or games, where the player was able to return in the same season, was 12 days (range 2-127 days). The majority (68.3%) of injuries occurred in the lower limbs, with 18.6% in the upper limbs. The trunk and head/neck regions accounted for 8.6% and 4.1% injuries, respectively. The distribution of injury type was significantly different (p<0.001) between upper and lower extremities: fractures (upper 36.1%, lower 1.5%), muscle strain (upper 5.2%, lower 45.8%).

CONCLUSIONS: These data provide stable, multiannual data on injury patterns in hurling, identifying the most common injury problems. This is the first step in applying a systematic, theory-driven injury prevention model in the sport.


Language: en

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