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Journal Article

Citation

Cunningham CE, Chen Y, Vaillancourt T, Rimas H, Deal K, Cunningham LJ, Ratcliffe J. Aggressive Behav. 2014; 41(4): 369-385.

Affiliation

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2014, International Society for Research on Aggression, Publisher John Wiley and Sons)

DOI

10.1002/ab.21560

PMID

25231901

Abstract

Adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis was used to study the anti-cyberbullying program preferences of 1,004 university students. More than 60% reported involvement in cyberbullying as witnesses (45.7%), victims (5.7%), perpetrator-victims (4.9%), or perpetrators (4.5%). Men were more likely to report involvement as perpetrators and perpetrator-victims than were women. Students recommended advertisements featuring famous people who emphasized the impact of cyberbullying on victims. They preferred a comprehensive approach teaching skills to prevent cyberbullying, encouraging students to report incidents, enabling anonymous online reporting, and terminating the internet privileges of students involved as perpetrators. Those who cyberbully were least likely, and victims of cyberbullying were most likely, to support an approach combining prevention and consequences. Simulations introducing mandatory reporting, suspensions, or police charges predicted a substantial reduction in the support of uninvolved students, witnesses, victims, and perpetrators. Aggr. Behav. 9999:XX-XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Language: en

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