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Journal Article

Citation

Jones MP, Chapman P, Bailey K. Accid. Anal. Prev. 2014; 73C: 296-304.

Affiliation

School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, England, United Kingdom.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2014, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.aap.2014.09.019

PMID

25265192

Abstract

Currently there is little research into the relationship between emotion and driving in the context of advertising and distraction. Research that has looked into this also has methodological limitations that could be affecting the results rather than emotional processing (Trick et al., 2012). The current study investigated the relationship between image valence and risk perception, eye movements and physiological reactions. Participants watched hazard perception clips which had emotional images from the international affective picture system overlaid onto them. They rated how hazardous or safe they felt, whilst eye movements, galvanic skin response and heart rate were recorded.

RESULTS suggested that participants were more aware of potential hazards when a neutral image had been shown, in comparison to positive and negative valenced images; that is, participants showed higher subjective ratings of risk, larger physiological responses and marginally longer fixation durations when viewing a hazard after a neutral image, but this effect was attenuated after emotional images. It appears that emotional images reduce sensitivity to potential hazards, and we suggest that future studies could apply these findings to higher fidelity paradigms such as driving simulators.


Keywords: Driver distraction;


Language: en

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