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Journal Article

Citation

McIntire LK, McKinley RA, Goodyear C, McIntire JP. Appl. Ergon. 2014; 45(2): 354-362.

Affiliation

Infoscitex, Inc., 2510 Fifth Street Building 20840, WPAFB, OH 45433, USA. Electronic address: Lindsey.mcintire@wpafb.af.mil.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2014, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.apergo.2013.04.020

PMID

23722006

Abstract

Research has shown that sustained attention or vigilance declines over time on task. Sustained attention is necessary in many environments such as air traffic controllers, cyber operators, and imagery analysts. A lapse of attention in any one of these environments can have harmful consequences. The purpose of this study was to determine if eye blink metrics from an eye-tracker are related to changes in vigilance performance and cerebral blood flow velocities. Nineteen participants performed a vigilance task while wearing an eye-tracker on four separate days. Blink frequency and duration changed significantly over time during the task. Both blink frequency and duration increased as performance declined and right cerebral blood flow velocity declined. These results suggest that eye blink information may be an indicator of arousal levels. Using an eye-tracker to detect changes in eye blinks in an operational environment would allow preventative measures to be implemented, perhaps by providing perceptual warning signals or augmenting human cognition through non-invasive brain stimulation techniques.


Language: en

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