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Journal Article

Citation

Haas JS, Goldman L. Am. J. Public Health 1994; 84(10): 1605-1608.

Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1994, American Public Health Association)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

8604771

PMCID

PMC1380527

Abstract

OBJECTIVES. This study was designed to determine whether resource use and mortality differed by insurance status for patients with acute trauma. METHODS. All adults emergently hospitalized in Massachusetts during 1990 with acute trauma (n = 15,008) were examined. RESULTS. After adjustment for confounders, uninsured patients were as likely to receive care in an intensive care unit as were patients with private insurance (odds ratio [OR] = 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85, 1.11) but were less likely to undergo an operative procedure (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.63, 0.74) or physical therapy (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.57,0.67) and were more likely to die in a hospital (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.44, 3.19). Compared with patients with private insurance, those with Medicaid were less likely to receive an operative procedure (0.85, 0.75-0.97), were equally likely to receive care in an intensive care unit (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.86, 1.30) or physical therapy (OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.79, 1.02), and were no more likely to die (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.69,2.39). CONCLUSIONS. These results suggest that the uninsured receive less trauma-related care and have a higher mortality rate. The excess mortality in uninsured patients may be avoided if their resource use is increased to that of insured patients.

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