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Journal Article

Citation

Lavender SA, Mehta JP, Hedman GE, Park S, Reichelt PA, Conrad KM. Appl. Ergon. 2015; 50: 87-97.

Affiliation

Division of Health Policy and Administration, School of Public Health, The University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2015, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.apergo.2015.02.008

PMID

25959322

Abstract

The physical demands on evacuators were investigated when using different types of sled-type stair descent devices designed for the emergency evacuation of high rise buildings. Twelve firefighters used six sled-type stair descent devices during simulated evacuations. The devices were evaluated under two staircase width conditions (1.12, and 1.32 m). Dependent measures included electromyographic (EMG) data, heart rates, Borg Scale ratings, and descent velocities. All stair descent speeds were below those reported during pedestrian egress trials. With the exception of the inflatable device, the devices operated by two evacuators had higher descent speeds than those operated by a single evacuator. High friction materials under the sleds facilitated control and reduced the muscle demands on stairs but increased physical demands on the landings. Usability assessments found devices with shorter overall lengths had fewer wall contacts on the landing, and handles integrated in the straps were preferred by the evacuators.


Language: en

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