SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Sabella D. Am. J. Nurs. 2011; 111(2): 28-37; quiz 38-9.

Affiliation

College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA. ds842@drexel.edu

Comment In:

Am J Nurs 2011;111(2):7.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2011, American Nurses Association, Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

10.1097/01.NAJ.0000394289.55577.b6

PMID

21270581

Abstract

Human trafficking, also called modern slavery, happens worldwide--and the United States is no exception. Within our borders, thousands of foreign nationals and U.S. citizens, many of them children, are forced or coerced into sex work or various forms of labor every year. Nurses and other health care providers who encounter victims of trafficking often don't realize it, and opportunities to intervene are lost. Although no one sign can demonstrate with certainty when someone is being trafficked, there are several indicators that clinicians should know. This article provides an overview of human trafficking, describes how to recognize signs that a person is being trafficked and how to safely intervene, and offers an extensive resource list.


Language: en

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print