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Journal Article

Citation

Rezae L, Najafi F, Moradinazar M, Ahmadijouybari T. J. Inj. Violence Res. 2014; 6(1): 50-52.

Affiliation

Imam Khomeini Hospital, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. E-mail: moradi.mehd1363@yahoo.com.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2014, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences)

DOI

10.5249/jivr.v6i1.323

PMID

23831738

PMCID

PMC3865456

Abstract

The penetration of objects into the orbit can lead to blindness and even to the death of the patient. The penetration of organic objects longer than 7 cm into the eye is a rare phenomenon. In this study, we report a case in which a 6-year-old boy fell on a pencil which penetrated the upper side of his right eye orbit. Because of the agitation of the child and the lack of access, it was not possible to perform a brain or orbital computed tomography (CT) scan, but an X-ray showed that the object had gone directly into the retro-orbital space. As the result of a clinical diagnosis, it was possible to ascertain that the globe was severely hypertonic. Throughout this process the child was extremely agitated. After consultation with the neurosurgery service, the patient was rushed to the operation room. After anesthesia and superanasal peritomy, the pencil was removed slowly from the orbit. Neurology and CT scans after surgery didn't show any ocular or brain symptoms. Once the patient's general condition had improved sufficiently and his visual acuity had returned to 10/10, he was discharged from the hospital. This case shows that even without specialized tests, such as CT scans, an organ can be saved.


Language: en

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