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Journal Article

Citation

Glazebrook K, Townsend E, Sayal K. Arch. Suicide Res. 2015; 20(2): 205-218.

Affiliation

c Division of Psychiatry, Developmental Psychiatry , Queen's Medical Centre, University of Nottingham , Nottingham.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2015, International Academy of Suicide Research, Publisher Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)

DOI

10.1080/13811118.2015.1004495

PMID

26699201

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Insecure attachment is associated with self-harm in young people, but little research has explored the pathways through which this relationship develops. We investigated whether attachment impacts on self-harm via its effect on coping strategies and appraisal of problem-solving abilities.

METHODS: 314 students aged 18-20 years completed an online survey with measures of parental attachment, emotion-focused and problem-focused coping strategies, and psychological distress and self-harm.

RESULTS: A mediational model was not supported as there were no direct effects between parental attachment and self-harm. However, analysis of specific indirect pathways revealed that perceived parental attachment impacts on self-harm through problem-focused coping. Higher quality of attachment was associated with greater reliance on problem-focused (adaptive) coping, which in turn was associated with a decreased risk of having self-harmed. Furthermore, poorer paternal attachment was associated with lower appraisal of problem-solving skills, which in turn was associated with an increased risk of having self-harmed.

CONCLUSION: Individuals with insecure attachment may be more vulnerable to self-harm because they lack other more constructive coping strategies for relieving stress.


Language: en

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