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Journal Article

Citation

Demelash H, Nigatu D, Gashaw K. Obstet. Gynecol. Int. 2015; 2015: e394875.

Affiliation

Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Madawalabu University, Goba, Bale, Ethiopia.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2015, Hindawi Publishing)

DOI

10.1155/2015/394875

PMID

26798345

PMCID

PMC4698783

Abstract

Introduction. Violence against women has serious consequences for their reproductive and sexual health including birth outcomes. In Ethiopia, though the average parity of pregnant women is much higher than in other African countries, the link between intimate partner violence with low birth weight is unknown.

OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to examine the association between intimate partner violence and low birth weight among pregnant women.

METHOD. Hospital based case-control study was conducted among 387 mothers (129 cases and 258 controls). Anthropometric measurements were taken both from mothers and their live births. The association between intimate partner violence and birth weight was computed through bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses and statistical significance was declared at P < 0.05. Result. Out of 387 interviewed mothers, 100 (25.8%) had experienced intimate partner violence during their index pregnancy period. Relatively more mothers of low birth weight infants were abused (48%) compared with controls (16.4%). Those mothers who suffered acts of any type of intimate partner violence during pregnancy were three times more likely to have a newborn with low birth weight (95% CI; (1.57 to 7.18)). The association between overall intimate partner violence and LBW was adjusted for potential confounder variables.

CONCLUSION. This research result gives insight for health professional about the importance of screening for intimate partner violence during pregnancy. Health care providers should consider violence in their practice and try to identify women at risk.


Language: en

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