SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Puhl RM, Neumark-Sztainer D, Bryn Austin S, Suh Y, Wakefield DB. J. Sch. Health 2016; 86(7): 507-515.

Affiliation

Center for Public Health & Health Policy, University of Connecticut, 195 Farmington Avenue, Suite 2100, Farmington, CT 06032. dwakefield@uchc.edu.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2016, American School Health Association, Publisher John Wiley and Sons)

DOI

10.1111/josh.12401

PMID

27246675

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Weight-related bullying is prevalent among youth and associated with adverse health consequences, including increased risk for body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviors, which are risk factors for eating disorders. Although concerns about these problems have stimulated calls for broader intervention efforts in schools, actions thus far have been limited. This study examined educators' perspectives about potential policy actions to address these issues in schools.

METHODS: Educators (N = 240) completed an online questionnaire assessing their support for 11 potential school-based policy actions to address weight-related bullying and eating disorders. Participants also rated policies according to their feasibility and potential for positive impact.

RESULTS: Forty-eight percent of participants observed weight-related bullying in their school and 99% expressed the importance of intervening in such incidents. A large majority (75%-94%) supported 8 of the 11 policies, especially actions requiring school-based health curriculum to include content on eating disorder prevention (94%), and addressing weight-bullying through antibullying policies (92%), staff training (89%), and school curriculum (89%). Strongly supported policies were viewed by participants as being the most impactful and feasible to implement.

CONCLUSIONS: Educators recognize weight-related bullying and eating disorders as problems in their schools that warrant improved prevention and intervention efforts at the policy level.

© 2016, American School Health Association.


Language: en

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print