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Journal Article

Citation

Hemmer A, Meier P, Reisch T. PLoS One 2017; 12(1): e0169625.

Affiliation

Department of Medicine, University Hospital of Psychiatry, Bern, Switzerland.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2017, Public Library of Science)

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0169625

PMID

28060950

Abstract

The goal of the study was to compare the effectiveness of different suicide prevention measures implemented on bridges and other high structures in Switzerland. A national survey identified all jumping hotspots that have been secured in Switzerland; of the 15 that could be included in this study, 11 were secured by vertical barriers and 4 were secured by low-hanging horizontal safety nets. The study made an overall and individual pre-post analysis by using Mantel-Haenszel Tests, regression methods and calculating rate ratios. Barriers and safety nets were both effective, with mean suicide reduction of 68.7% (barriers) and 77.1% (safety nets), respectively. Measures that do not secure the whole hotspot and still allow jumps of 15 meters or more were less effective. Further, the analyses revealed that barriers of at least 2.3 m in height and safety-nets fixed significantly below pedestrian level deterred suicidal jumps. Secured bridgeheads and inbound angle barriers seemed to enhance the effectiveness of the measure.

FINDINGS can help to plan and improve the effectiveness of future suicide prevention measures on high structures.


Language: en

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