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Journal Article

Citation

Tanveer S, Zecavati N, Delasobera EB, Oyegbile TO. Pediatr. Neurol. 2017; 70: 44-49.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2017, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2017.02.001

PMID

28320567

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Studies have documented gender differences associated with concussion. The purpose of this study was to determine if these gender differences are also noted within a pediatric population.

METHODS: This prospective study analyzed 1971 patients who had completed preconcussion and postconcussion neuropsychological testing within the Washington, DC, area.

RESULTS: Our results showed that children and adolescents with concussion exhibit gender differences with respect to risk factors, recovery, and symptomatology. Females are more likely to present with a concussion (P < 0.001), experience more discomfort from a concussion (P < 0.001), and seek treatment for postconcussive headaches (P < 0.001). On the other hand, males are more likely to sustain a concussion from a contact sport (P < 0.001) and experience loss of consciousness, confusion, and amnesia with a concussion more frequently than females (P < 0.001). Postconcussive cognitive function also differs by gender. Both males and females exhibit a decline in cognitive testing compared with baseline (P < 0.001); however, visual memory (P = 0.02) is more affected in females than in males. These findings remain unchanged among pediatric patients aged ≥14 years; however, no gender differences were noted in individuals aged ≤13 years.

CONCLUSION: It is important for health care providers, schools, athletic trainers, and coaches to be aware of these gender differences associated with concussion in order to provide adequate surveillance and appropriate monitoring and support during the recovery period.

Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Language: en

Keywords

cognitive testing; concussion; gender; pediatric

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