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Journal Article

Citation

Evans L. J. Trauma 2001; 50(2): 281-288.

Affiliation

Science Serving Society, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, USA. LE@ScienceServingSociety.com

Copyright

(Copyright © 2001, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

10.1097/00005373-200102000-00014

PMID

11242293

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: If a female and a male suffer similar potentially lethal physical impacts, which of them (other factors being equal) is more likely to die? This question is addressed using 245,836 traffic fatalities. METHODS: Fatality risk ratios were estimated using crash data for cars, light trucks, and motorcycles with two occupants, at least one being killed. Combinations of seat belt use, helmet use, and seating location led to 14 occupant categories. RESULTS: Relationships between fatality risk and gender are similar for all 14 occupant categories. Female fatality risk exceeds male risk from preteens to late 50s. For ages from about 20 to about 35, female risk exceeds male risk by (28 +/- 3)%. CONCLUSION: Whereas specific injury mechanisms differ greatly between the 14 occupant categories, the effect of gender on fatality risk does not, thus implying that the relationships reflect fundamental gender-dependent differences.

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