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Journal Article

Citation

Campolettano ET, Bland ML, Gellner RA, Sproule DW, Rowson B, Tyson AM, Duma SM, Rowson S. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 2017; 45(12): 2733-2741.

Affiliation

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA. srowson@vt.edu.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2017, Holtzbrinck Springer Nature Publishing Group)

DOI

10.1007/s10439-017-1921-6

PMID

28913606

Abstract

Regulations have allowed for increased unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) operations over the last decade, yet operations over people are still not permitted. The objective of this study was to estimate the range of injury risks to humans due to UAS impact. Three commercially-available UAS models that varied in mass (1.2-11 kg) were evaluated to estimate the range of risk associated with UAS-human interaction. Live flight and falling impact tests were conducted using an instrumented Hybrid III test dummy. On average, live flight tests were observed to be less severe than falling impact tests. The maximum risk of AIS 3+ injury associated with live flight tests was 11.6%, while several falling impact tests estimated risks exceeding 50%. Risk of injury was observed to increase with increasing UAS mass, and the larger models tested are not safe for operations over people in their current form. However, there is likely a subset of smaller UAS models that are safe to operate over people. Further, designs which redirect the UAS away from the head or deform upon impact transfer less energy and generate lower risk. These data represent a necessary impact testing foundation for future UAS regulations on operations over people.


Language: en

Keywords

Brain; Cervical spine; Concussion; Drone; Neck; Skull

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