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Journal Article

Citation

Kizilhan JI. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017; 15(1): e15010044.

Affiliation

Department of Transcultural Psychosomatic, MediClin-Klinik am Vogelsang Donaueschingen, 78166 Donaueschingen, Germany. kizilhan@dhbw-vs.de.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2017, MDPI: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)

DOI

10.3390/ijerph15010044

PMID

29283370

Abstract

People from family-oriented societies in particular, in addition to having a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suffer from chronic pain and physical complaints. Such people have a different understanding of physical illness and pain and, compared to patients from western societies, have different ideas on healing, even when confronted with the therapist. Hitherto, these factors have not been sufficiently taken into account in modern, multi-module therapy approaches. Trauma can be perceived via pain and physical complaints, whereby the pain is not restricted to one part of the body but is seen as covering the body as a whole. Therefore, in the treatment and above all in the patient-therapist relationship, it is necessary to understand what importance is attached to the perceived pain in relation to the trauma. The afflicted body expresses the trauma in the shape of its further-reaching consequences such as the patient's social, collective, economic and cultural sensitivity. Therefore, for the effective treatment of trauma and chronic pain, it is necessary to use a multi-modal, interdisciplinary, and culture-sensitive approach when treating patients from traditional cultural backgrounds.


Language: en

Keywords

culture; family-oriented societies; pain; pain perception; post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); understanding of illness

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