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Journal Article

Citation

Hsiao C, Fry D, Ward CL, Ganz G, Casey T, Zheng X, Fang X. BMJ Glob. Health 2018; 3(1): e000573.

Affiliation

School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2018, BMJ Publishing Group)

DOI

10.1136/bmjgh-2017-000573

PMID

29515918

PMCID

PMC5838395

Abstract

Despite the extent and magnitude of violence against children in South Africa, political and financial investments to prevent violence against children remain low. A recent costing study investigating the social burden and economic impact of violence against children in South Africa found notable reductions to mental and physical health outcomes in the population if children were prevented from experiencing violence, neglect and witnessing family violence. The results showed, among others, that drug abuse in the entire population could be reduced by up to 14% if sexual violence against children could be prevented, self-harm could be reduced by 23% in the population if children did not experience physical violence, anxiety could be reduced by 10% if children were not emotionally abused, alcohol abuse could be reduced by 14% in women if they did not experience neglect as children, and lastly, interpersonal violence in the population could be reduced by 16% if children did not witness family violence. The study further estimated that the cost of inaction in 2015 amounted to nearly 5% of the country's gross domestic product. These findings show that preventing children from experiencing and witnessing violence can help to strengthen the health of a nation by ensuring children reach their full potential and drive the country's economy and growth. The paper further discusses ways in which preventing and ending violence against children may be prioritised in South Africa through, for instance, intersectoral collaboration and improving routine monitoring data, such as through the sustainable development goals.


Language: en

Keywords

health policies and all other topics; other study design; public health

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